Question: How Many Feet Is The Conductor Away From The Orchestra?

Does the orchestra actually watch the conductor?

One of the visual pleasures of a live orchestral concert is watching the conductor and seeing what kinds of gestures he makes and what difference, if any, those make to what you hear the orchestra doing. Some conductors make a great show on the podium but to little effect; others’ every move is reflected in the music.

Does the conductor actually do anything?

The conductor is there to bring a musical score to life, communicating their own highly refined sense of the work through an individual language of gestures, which might sculpt the musical line, tease out nuances, emphasise certain musical elements while controlling others, and essentially re-imagine an old piece anew.

Is an orchestra conductor really necessary?

Because most of the orchestras in the world can play together without any conductor. You are there to help them play better musically, and help them make a sound that is more coherent, that makes more sense from the composer’s point of view.”

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Why do conductors look out of time?

Because the baton typically narrows to a very fine point, it’s quite clear to the performers on stage where that is, but when you get further from the conductor, the further up the baton you’ll see, meaning it will look even more out of time to you as the 30m or so distance audience member.

Why do conductors wave their hands?

Beat and tempo At the beginning of a piece of music, the conductor raises his hands (or hand if he only uses a single hand) to indicate that the piece is about to begin. This is a signal for the orchestra members to ready their instruments to be played or for the choristers to be ready and watching.

Why does the conductor shake hands with the first violinist?

Why does the conductor shake hands with the concertmaster at the beginning and end of each concert? When the conductor shakes hands with the concertmaster, it is a gesture of greetings or thanks to the entire orchestra. It is a custom of respect and a symbol of cooperation.

What is a conductor’s stick called?

A baton is a stick that is used by conductors primarily to enlarge and enhance the manual and bodily movements associated with directing an ensemble of musicians.

Why does the conductor leave and come back?

After each major piece, the conductor will take a bow and then leave the stage. However, if the audience keeps clapping, he’ll come back out to acknowledge the applause and point out musicians in the orchestra who played particularly well.

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Do musicians look at the conductor?

Orchestral musicians may look directly at a conductor if they are looking for a cue they know the conductor plans to provide, but usually only if they find it helpful. Most members can also see the conductor’s gesticulations in their peripheral vision even when they aren’t looking directly at him or her.

What makes a good orchestra conductor?

Unlike the master chef, the great conductor must have not only manual skills and superb taste, but the essential gifts of acute hearing and the ability to communicate with musicians in verbal and non-verbal ways. He is involved in choosing new musicians who, in effect, become how the orchestra plays.

How many players are in an orchestra?

A symphony orchestra will usually have over eighty musicians on its roster, in some cases over a hundred, but the actual number of musicians employed in a particular performance may vary according to the work being played and the size of the venue.

Why are conductors off beat?

Here’s the simple response: When an orchestra plays behind the conductor, it has the room to produce a more expressive sound. Waiting a tick allows the ensemble to take in the trajectory, speed and style of a conductor’s beat, which helps them determine what kind of sound the conductor is hoping to achieve.

Why does Gergiev conduct with a toothpick?

The rumour is that Gergiev started using a toothpick to conduct because his movements whilst conducting were so violent that he was in the habit of losing his grip on the baton and it would go flying into the audience or the orchestra.

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